Photo of William W. Kannel

Bill Kannel is a Member in the firm’s Boston office and the Section Head for the Bankruptcy & Restructuring Practice. He focuses on commercial law, workouts, and corporate reorganization and has represented institutional lenders, indenture trustees, bondholders, and other creditors, debtors, and trustees in insolvency proceedings in courts throughout the United States. Bill is active in the American Bankruptcy Institute and the Turnaround Management Association and frequently lectures and writes on insolvency issues.

Last week, President Trump unveiled his proposal to fix our nation’s aging infrastructure. While the proposal lauded $1.5 trillion in new spending, it only included $200 billion in federal funding. To bridge this sizable gap, the plan largely relies on public private partnerships (often referred to as P3s) that can use tax-exempt bond financing. In evaluating bankruptcy and default risk with P3s and similar quasi-governmental entities it is important to understand whether such entities are eligible debtors under the Bankruptcy Code, and, if so, whether they are Chapter 11 or Chapter 9 eligible.

Continue Reading Checking-In: Chapter 9, Chapter 11 or Ineligible?


A few thoughts on Tuesday’s oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in the litigation over whether Puerto Rico’s Public Corporations Debt Enforcement and Recovery Act, an insolvency statute for certain of its government instrumentalities, is void, as the lower federal courts held, under Section 903 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code:

Continue Reading You Can Lead a Horse to Water, But You Can’t Call it an Airplane: Supreme Court Oral Arguments Suggest Puerto Rico’s Recovery Act May Recover


It is said that muddy water is best cleared by leaving it be.  The Supreme Court’s December 4 decision to review the legality of Puerto Rico’s local bankruptcy law, the Recovery Act, despite a well-reasoned First Circuit Court of Appeals opinion affirming the U.S. District Court in San Juan’s decision voiding the Recovery Act on the grounds that it conflicts with Section 903 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, suggests, at a minimum, that at least four of the Justices deemed the questions raised too interesting to let the First Circuit have the last word. This discretionary granting of Puerto Rico’s certiorari petition further muddies the already roiling Puerto Rican waters.

Continue Reading Que Certa, Certa: Supreme Court’s Review of Puerto Rico Recovery Act May Hinder Creditor Negotiations

Bill Kannel was recently quoted in The Deal‘s article “Taking bankruptcies too fast around the curve” regarding the growing trend of shorter, preplanned Chapter 11 cases.  Experts debate the causes and effects including a potential link between case length and refilings as companies skim over key structural and operational issues in favor of more dynamic and immediate fixes.



Last week, the Working Group for the Fiscal and Economic Recovery of Puerto Rico gave the broadest hint yet of the next tactic in Puerto Rico’s ongoing quest to deleverage itself.  Although the details have not yet been articulated, Puerto Rico apparently proposes to blend into a single pot several types of distinct taxes currently earmarked to pay or support different types of bonds issued by a number of its legally separate municipal bond issuers, with the hope that the resulting concoction will meet the tastes of a sufficient number of its differing bond creditors to induce them to voluntarily exchange their various types of bonds for a single type of new debt presumably supported by the new blended tax revenue stream.

According to the “Restructuring Process and Principles” slides released by the Working Group on September 24, “the Working Group is working with the Commonwealth’s advisors to structure a debt-relief transaction that will permit the Commonwealth’s available surplus to be used to make payments on its indebtedness while the initiatives and reforms undertaken as part of the Fiscal and Economic Growth Plan take hold.”  Per the release, “[t]he consensual negotiation and ultimate transaction will seek to involve not just creditors of one governmental entity, but instead the creditors of many entities, as part of a single, comprehensive exchange transaction. The  goal of this approach is to avoid a piecemeal strategy that may result in uncoordinated and inconsistent agreements with creditors, litigation among creditor groups, and a lower chance of success.”

As the saying goes, good luck with that.

Continue Reading Can Alphabet Soup Fix Puerto Rico’s Debt Service Issues?